Informa
主要演讲

James Crowe, Jr., M.D.

Deciphering the Human Immunome

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Andreas Pluckthun, Ph.D.

Paracrine Delivery: Therapeutic Biomolecules Produced in situ

University of Zurich

William Pardridge, M.D.

Biologic Drug Delivery Across the Blood-Brain Barrier with IgG Fusion Proteins

UCLA / ArmaGen

Peter Chin, M.D.

Ocrelizumab in Relapsing and Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

Genentech Inc

7:15am - 8:15am

Registration and Coffee

8:15am - 8:25am

Chairman's Opening Remarks

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  • James Marks, M.D., Ph.D. - Professor and Vice Chairman, University of California, San Francisco
SHOWING OF STREAMS
SHOWING OF STREAMS
SHOWING OF STREAMS
SHOWING OF STREAMS
SHOWING OF STREAMS

6:15pm - 7:15pm

Opening Night Reception with Exhibits and Poster Viewing

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Please join your fellow attendees in the exhibit hall for an evening of networking while enjoying beverages, and hors d'oeuvres!

7:15am 8:15am (60 mins)

Registration and Coffee

8:15am 8:25am (10 mins)

Chairman's Opening Remarks

  • James Marks, M.D., Ph.D. - Professor and Vice Chairman, University of California, San Francisco

8:25am 9:10am (45 mins)

Keynote Presentations

Deciphering the Human Immunome

We are sequencing the complete Human Immunome, defined as the repertoire of expressed B and T cell receptors. Deciphering the immunome, and associating the immune repertoire to antigen specificity, holds the transformative potential to usher in a new era of rational vaccine discovery and development of new and improved immunotherapies.

  • James Crowe, Jr., M.D. - Director, Vanderbilt Vaccine Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center

9:10am 9:15am (5 mins)

Keynote Presentations

Keynote Questions

9:15am 10:00am (45 mins)

Keynote Presentations

Paracrine Delivery: Therapeutic Biomolecules Produced in situ

Cancer will have to be fought with cocktails of therapeutics, which may have to include therapeutic antibodies against receptors, checkpoint inhibitors, as well as cytokines to modify the tumor microenvironment. We have recently developed a technology of using non-replicative adenovirus, engineered to target desired cells and also to be shielded from the immune response, as a vehicle for simultaneous delivery of multiple genes of therapeutic proteins, produced and secreted by the infected cells.

  • Andreas Pluckthun, Ph.D. - Professor and Director, Department of Biochemistry, University of Zurich

10:00am 10:05am (5 mins)

Keynote Presentations

Keynote Questions

10:05am 10:35am (30 mins)

Keynote Presentations

Networking Refreshment Break

10:35am 11:20am (45 mins)

Keynote Presentations

Biologic Drug Delivery Across the Blood-Brain Barrier with IgG Fusion Proteins

Brain-penetrating biologic drugs are yet to be approved for brain disorders, owing to the lack of transport of these large molecule drugs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Any class of biologic drug (lysosomal enzyme, therapeutic antibody, decoy receptor, neurotrophin) has been re-engineered as BBB-penetrating IgG fusion proteins. The IgG domain is a peptidomimetic monoclonal antibody against the extracellular domain of an endogenous BBB peptide receptor/transporter, such as the insulin receptor or transferrin receptor. The receptor-specific IgG undergoes receptor-mediated transport across the BBB, and acts as a molecular Trojan horse to ferry into brain the fused biologic neurotherapeutic agent.

  • William Pardridge, M.D. - Distinguished Professor Emeritus / Founder and CSO, UCLA / ArmaGen

11:20am 11:25am (5 mins)

Keynote Presentations

Keynote Questions

11:25am 12:10pm (45 mins)

Keynote Presentations

Ocrelizumab in Relapsing and Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

Ocrelizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that selectively targets CD20, a cell-surface antigen that is expressed on pre-B cells, mature B cells, and memory B cells but not on lymphoid stem cells and plasma cells. Clinical trial results of ocrelizumab in relapsing and primary progressive forms of multiple sclerosis will be discussed.

  • Peter Chin, M.D. - Group Medical Director, Neuroscience, SPECTRUM Medical Unit, US Medical Affairs, Genentech Inc

12:10pm 12:15pm (5 mins)

Keynote Presentations

Keynote Questions

12:15pm 1:15pm (60 mins)

Scientific Luncheon Briefing 1

See More, Do More: Accelerate Your Antibody Characterization with Carterra's State-of-the-art Array SPR Imaging Platform, the LSA

Carterra's new LSA platform enables high throughput mAb characterization, including kinetics, affinity, epitope binning, epitope mapping, and quantitation while using minimal sample volumes. We will present case studies highlighting the screening of multiple antigens at various concentrations over large mAb panels in a capture kinetics format; and a comprehensive epitope binning analysis on a 384-mAb array in a single run.

  • Yasmina Abdiche, Ph.D. - Chief Scientific Officer, Carterra

12:15pm 1:15pm (60 mins)

Scientific Luncheon Briefing 2

The Beacon™ Platform: Innovating Drug Discovery and Antibody Engineering

Berkeley Lights has developed the Beacon™ platform that transforms cell based biological processes to speed the discovery and development of therapeutics.  Data will be presented on the workflows that incorporate massively parallel isolation, culture, analysis and selection of single cells in just one to two days for antibody engineering and discovery.

  • Keith Breinlinger, Ph.D. - General Manager, Life Sciences & Senior Vice President, Engineering, Berkeley Lights, Inc.

12:15pm 1:15pm (60 mins)

Scientific Luncheon Briefing 3

OmniRat®, OmniMouse® and OmniFlic®: Transgenic Animals for the Generation of Fully Human Mono- and Bi-Specific Antibodies

Ligand's OmniAb® platforms (OmniRat®, OmniMouse® and OmniFlic®) are based on novel, transgenic rodents that produce highly diversified antibody repertoires. This platform offers accelerated discovery of fully human mono- and bi-specific antibodies that are naturally optimized in vivo for manufacturability, therapeutic efficacy and reduced immunogenicity.

  • Christel Iffland, Ph.D. - Vice President, Antibody Technologies, Ligand Pharmaceuticals

12:15pm 1:15pm (60 mins)

Scientific Luncheon Briefing 4

Precisely Controlled, Highly Diverse Gene Mutant Libraries for Synthetic Biology and Bio-therapeutic Drug Discovery

  • Emily Le Proust, Ph.D. - Chief Executive Officer, Twist Bioscience

12:15pm 1:15pm (60 mins)

Scientific Luncheon Briefing 5

WSGR Briefing Title TBA

1:15pm 1:45pm (30 mins)

Scientific Briefing 1

How to Screen a Billion Drug Candidates? Single Cell Functional Assays: Ultra-sensitive, Ultra-fast, Ultra-high-throughput Next-Generation Drug Discovery

Improving the properties of antibody drug candidates targeting GPCRs is technically challenging since screens are optimally performed on the native functional receptor.  We present data that using de novo mutagenesis coupled with single cell functional assays allows for the screening of billions of CDR optimized anti-GPCR variants for improved agonist or antagonist activities.

  • Michael Gallo, Ph.D. - President, Research, Innovative Targeting Solutions

1:15pm 1:45pm (30 mins)

Scientific Briefing 2

High-Throughput Screening for Antibody Discovery Using Mirrorball

The antibody discovery industry has begun to set aside traditional assay formats such as ELISA or flow cytometry in favor of more sensitive, high-throughput technologies to screen for novel biologic candidates.  This presentation will highlight a selection of multiplex assays for the screening of hybridoma supernatants enabling the discovery process.

  • Christyne Kane, Ph.D. - Senior Scientist, Biologics, AbbVie Global Biologics

1:15pm 1:45pm (30 mins)

Scientific Briefing 3

Design, Build and Validation of Isogenica's Fully Synthetic Human Fab Library

We will present validation data on Isogenica's new fully synthetic human Fab library. Diverse heavy and light chain germlines, combined with the fully synthetic nature of the randomized CDR1, -2 and -3 regions ensure many issues with immune and naive libraries can be overcome. Colibra™ DNA library technology minimizes the presence of CMC liability motifs.

  • Guy Hermans, Ph.D. - Chief Scientific Officer, Isogenica

1:45pm 2:15pm (30 mins)

Scientific Briefing 1

Exceptional Human Antibody Discovery with a Best-in-Class Transgenic Mouse

The Trianni Mouse is the only human transgenic antibody discovery platform offering a complete heavy, kappa and lambda repertoire in a single organism. Sequences of the variable domain exons are human while all genetic machinery including extensively optimized promoters and enhancers are of mouse origin. Titers and class switching are extremely robust making for highly efficient lead generation. This next-generation technology is seen as best-in-class by multiple Big Pharma and other licensees subsequent to extensive validation and benchmarking. Additional strains in development include Plasma Ig, Autoimmune/All Epitope and a "true" Bispecific.

  • David Meininger, Ph.D. - Chief Business Officer, TRIANNI, Inc.

1:45pm 2:15pm (30 mins)

Scientific Briefing 2

An Integrated Approach to Managing Immunogenicity Risk and Drug Immune Modulation

Immunogenicity is one of the most complex issues to address in drug design and development. Integrated platforms such as, Mass Spectrometry antigen presentation assays; DC-T and T cell proliferation assays for biologic lead selection/optimization; HLA-peptide binding assays to characterize individual epitopes and undiluted whole blood cytokine storm assays, can be used to mitigate immunogenicity risk and characterize immune responses directed toward biologics.

  • Jeremy Fry, D.Phil - Director of Sales, ProImmune Ltd.

1:45pm 2:15pm (30 mins)

Scientific Briefing 3

HuMab chickens: The Next Generation Antibody Discovery Platform

Transgenic rodents producing human sequence antibodies are widely accepted as a reliable source of therapeutic candidates.  However, their repertoires are limited by their evolutionary similarity to humans.  Crystal Bioscience has expanded the repertoire of transgenic animals by engineering HuMab chickens producing fully human sequence, high affinity mAbs.  In addition to revealing novel epitopes and, therefore novel IP, the Crystal Platform yields mAbs recognizing murine orthologs of human antigens that facilitate pre-clinical studies.

  • Bill Harriman, Ph.D. - Chief Science Officer, Crystal Bioscience

2:25pm 2:30pm (5 mins)

Track 1: Overcoming Delivery Challenges Including Brain and Intracellular Targets

Co-Chair Remarks

  • Co-Chair Paul Carter, Ph.D. - Senior Director and Staff Scientist, Antibody Engineering, Genentech, Inc.
  • Co-Chair Andreas Pluckthun, Ph.D. - Professor and Director, Department of Biochemistry, University of Zurich

2:30pm 3:00pm (30 mins)

Track 1: Overcoming Delivery Challenges Including Brain and Intracellular Targets

Enhancing Therapeutic Antibody Delivery across the BBB with Bispecific Antibodies Targeting TfR or CD98hc

The use of therapeutic antibodies for the treatment of neurological diseases is limited by poor penetration across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). One way to improve brain uptake of large molecules is to take advantage of endogenous receptors that mediate transcellular transport at the BBB. We used bispecific antibodies targeting TfR or CD98hc, receptors enriched at the BBB, as a means of improving antibody delivery to the brain.

  • Jasi Atwal, Ph.D. - Scientific Manager, Genentech

3:00pm 3:30pm (30 mins)

Track 1: Overcoming Delivery Challenges Including Brain and Intracellular Targets

Tissue Specific Delivery of Antibodies Via a Caveolae Associated Protein to Improve Drug Efficacy

Upon vascular administration, bio-therapeutics become broadly distributed throughout the body with only a fraction of dosed drug reaching the intended organ or tissue target. By targeting caveolae associated proteins, we improve both the delivery and efficacy of therapeutics that act within the lungs while concurrently reducing unintended interactions in tissues not being targeted.

  • M. Jack Borrok, Ph.D. - Scientist II, MedImmune

3:30pm 4:00pm (30 mins)

Track 1: Overcoming Delivery Challenges Including Brain and Intracellular Targets

Nanobodies as Inhaled Biotherapeutics for Lung Diseases, with ALX-0171 As Case Study

Local pulmonary delivery of biotherapeutics may offer advantages for the treatment of lung diseases. Delivery of the therapeutic entity directly to the lung has the potential for a rapid onset of action, reduced systemic exposure and the need for a lower dose, as well as needleless administration. Nanobodies are well suited for inhaled delivery to the lung which will be illustrated by the specific example of ALX-0171, a Nanobody in clinical development for the treatment of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections.

  • Diane Van Hoorick, Ph.D. - Senior Project Leader, Technology, Ablynx

4:00pm 4:45pm (45 mins)

Track 1: Overcoming Delivery Challenges Including Brain and Intracellular Targets

Networking Refreshment Break and Opening of Exhibit and Poster Hall

4:45pm 5:15pm (30 mins)

Track 1: Overcoming Delivery Challenges Including Brain and Intracellular Targets

Comparing the Cytosolic Delivery Efficiency of Protein Uptake Systems

A variety of transporters are being investigated for their capacity to shuttle macromolecular cargoes, especially proteins, into the cytosol. We recently developed the biotin ligase assay that allows the objective comparison of relative delivery efficiencies of various transport systems. Employing this assay, we have obtained novel insights into the protein transport capabilities of cell-penetrating peptides, supercharged proteins and bacterial toxins.

  • Wouter Verdurmen, Ph.D. - Research Associate, Department of Biochemistry, Radboud University Medical Center, Radboud Inst. for Molecular Life Science

5:15pm 5:45pm (30 mins)

Track 1: Overcoming Delivery Challenges Including Brain and Intracellular Targets

Intracellular Protein Delivery - Towards Artificial Immunotoxins

Learning from natural evolution of viruses and protein toxins, potent intracellular delivery carriers were generated by a chemical evolution process. Sequence-defined carriers by automated solid phase-assisted synthesis combine natural and artificial amino acids with other transport elements, providing receptor-targeting and endosomal release function. Screening in proper systems identified carriers for biomacromolecules including cytotoxic proteins or nanobodies.

  • Ernst Wagner, Ph.D. - Chair, Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, Center for System-based Drug Research, Ludwig Maximilans University

5:45pm 6:15pm (30 mins)

Track 1: Overcoming Delivery Challenges Including Brain and Intracellular Targets

Bacterial Secretion Systems for Intracellular Protein Delivery

Bacterial Type III Secretion Systems are essential for infection by many different pathogens. They are megadalton-sized syringe-like, membrane-embedded 'injectisomes' and transport bacterial proteins (toxins) across membranes directly into a eukaroytic host cell. Here we will discuss the requirements for substrate association with, transport through and exit from the injectisome. This guided the design of substrates that either become trapped or translocated as antibody-like molecules directly into eukaryotic cells.

  • Thomas Marlovits, Ph.D. - Professor for Structural and Systems Biology, Institute of Molecular Biotechnology, Austrian Academy of Sciences (IMBA)

2:25pm 2:30pm (5 mins)

Track 2: Novel Antibody Display, Selection and Screening Technologies

Chairman's Remarks

  • Chairperson Andrew Bradbury, Ph.D. - Research Scientist and Group Leader, Los Alamos National Laboratories

2:30pm 3:00pm (30 mins)

Track 2: Novel Antibody Display, Selection and Screening Technologies

How Big Are Antibody Libraries Really? How Do We Improve Them? Are We Accessing the Full Diversity?

In vitro antibody libraries have been used to generate antibodies against many different therapeutic lead targets. Theoretical and experimental analyses indicate that one would expect to select 1-3 antibodies from a 1e7 library. However, this does not appear to scale to larger libraries with diversities estimated to be >1 billion, suggesting either that libraries are less diverse than thought, or selection methods do not tap the full diversity. This talk will discuss the use of NGS to explore these issues and the application of NGS to the creation of improved antibody libraries.

  • Andrew Bradbury, Ph.D. - Research Scientist and Group Leader, Los Alamos National Laboratories

3:00pm 3:30pm (30 mins)

Track 2: Novel Antibody Display, Selection and Screening Technologies

Improved Methods for Discovering and Developing Antibodies with High Specificity and Favorable Biophysical Properties

There are many challenges associated with antibody discovery and development that require key technical advances to improve the rational and reliable generation of potent antibody therapeutics. I will discuss our progress in understanding and overcoming fundamental challenges related to the design and selection of antibodies with high affinity, specificity, stability and solubility.

  • Peter Tessier, Ph.D. - Albert M. Mattocks Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Chemical Engineering, Biointerfaces Institute, University of Michigan

3:30pm 4:00pm (30 mins)

Track 2: Novel Antibody Display, Selection and Screening Technologies

Engineering Alternative Scaffolds via Yeast Display

The presentation will discuss combinatorial design and yeast display selection of a set of ~20 small protein scaffolds including the Gp2 domain. The impacts of scaffold topology, library design, and selection strategies will be discussed.

  • Benjamin Hackel, Ph.D. - Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota

4:00pm 4:45pm (45 mins)

Track 2: Novel Antibody Display, Selection and Screening Technologies

Networking Refreshment Break and Opening of Exhibit and Poster Hall

4:45pm 5:15pm (30 mins)

Track 2: Novel Antibody Display, Selection and Screening Technologies

Detecting and Attacking Cancer Surface-omes with Recombinant Antibodies

The cell surface proteome (surface-ome) is the primary hub for cells to communicate with the outside world. Oncogenes cause huge changes in cells and we hypothesize many will lead to changes in the cancer surface-ome. Our lab uses new proteomic technologies to systematically understand how cancer cells remodel their membrane proteomes and generates recombinant antibodies to detect and attack them.

  • James Wells, Ph.D. - Professor, Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Harry and Dianna Hind Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences, UCSF

5:15pm 5:45pm (30 mins)

Track 2: Novel Antibody Display, Selection and Screening Technologies

Programming Antibodies and Antigens using Deep Sequencing-Enabled Protein Engineering

Next-generation sequencing has presented protein scientists with the ability to observe entire populations of molecules before, during, and after a high-throughput screen or selection for function. My group leverages this unprecedented wealth of sequence-function information to design and engineer antibody affinity, specificity, and function. My talk will present an overview of the above and detail ways to integrate these technologies into typical antibody discovery workflows.

  • Tim Whitehead, Ph.D. - Associate Professor, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University

5:45pm 6:15pm (30 mins)

Track 2: Novel Antibody Display, Selection and Screening Technologies

Functional Interrogation and Mining of Natively Paired Heavy:Light Human Antibody Repertoires

Here we present a simple technology for analyzing antigen specificity and affinity of millions of human B cells, and for rapid human antibody discovery. Natively paired antibody VH:VL amplicons are generated en masse from single B cell emulsions, cloned into an optimized yeast display platform, and functionally interrogated by FACS. Here we show the development of this new display platform and its application isolate HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies from the B cell repertoire of an HIV-1 slow progressor, and also to discover nM-affinity antibodies targeting Ebola virus (EboV) glycoprotein that were elicited by a Phase 1 EboV vaccine clinical trial.

  • Brandon DeKosky, Ph.D. - Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, The University of Kansas

6:15pm 7:15pm (60 mins)

Opening Night Reception with Exhibits and Poster Viewing

Please join your fellow attendees in the exhibit hall for an evening of networking while enjoying beverages, and hors d'oeuvres!

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